Homeschooling High School

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John is 8th grade this year. That means that we are right on the edge of a scary, yet exciting step in our family life. Yes, I mean high school. We’ve always said that beyond a certain age that the decision to homeschool (or not) is up to the each individual child. John has chosen to continue homeschooling through high school. I’m excited about that. And nervous. So, I’m doing a lot of research and thinking about curriculum. I’m also finding that the response from other people is similar to what I heard 9 years ago when we began this journey. I think a lot of people can imagine homeschooling a 1st grader but when it gets to high school they can’t imagine what that would be like. And in all honesty, since I haven’t done it yet, I can only guess what it will be like. But I thought I’d answer some of the many questions I’ve been getting recently.

How do “they” know that you’re doing all the required classes?
The answer to that depends on the state you live in. We happen to live in a state with very minimal requirements. So for us, the answer is really that there aren’t any required classes. I do have to notify the state at the beginning of the year about our plans to homeschool and tell them our basic curriculum. We also need to do some kind of end of year evaluation to show progress. But we don’t have to follow the same curriculum as the public schools.

That said, most homeschoolers I know do try and have their high schooled students meet the same rough requirements as public schooled kids for the sake of college. So if most students in your state take four years of history, it’s probably a good idea to not do only 1 or 2 years. But you don’t really have to study the same material that they do in public school.

What about PE?
This is sort of the same question as above but it seems to get asked separately. I think there are some states where homeschoolers do have to document PE as well as other specific requirements. We don’t have to do that so I don’t plan on doing any kind of formal PE. Being active and exercising are different. John is a year-round swimmer and active with Scouts. He bikes and hikes and is fairly active. So in my mind PE already has a nice checkmark by it.

What about socialization?
Ok, no one actually asks that question in those words. They did back when we were starting out in kindergarten. But now the question is asked in different ways: What about prom? What about hanging out with friends? What about sports?

I wrote a long time ago that socialization is not the non-issue that some homeschoolers might say it is. As my kids have gotten older I’ve also realized that their need for social interaction varies widely. John is an introvert, like me. He has a good small group of friends but he isn’t someone who needs (or wants) to be with people all day long. As he’s gotten older we’ve purposely invested more time in activities that enable him to deepen his relationships with his closest friends.

Also, it won’t come as a shock to other homeschoolers, but there is a homeschool version of just about every high school social activity. Our co-op has a student government, a yearbook, a graduation ceremony, a very active drama group, a high-level speech and debate club and multiple social events yearly. There are multiple homeschool proms in the area and multiple different organizations that offer varsity level homeschool sports.

How will you teach Math? And Science?
I get this question a LOT. Ironically, these are the two subjects I worry about the least. For me the question is more how to teach a foreign language. Or writing. Or music. But it’s the same idea. How do you teach a subject that you are not an expert in?

There are oodles of options for homeschoolers who don’t feel able to teach a particular subject themselves. There are co-ops. There are online classes meant for homeschoolers. There are also other online or non-traditional classes meant for anyone. There is dual enrollment at a community college. There are tutors.

Different families use outside options to a different extent. Some families outsource almost all of their high school classes. Others teach almost everything at home. We will likely use a mix. Next year, John will continue to do Latin online with the same provider that he did Latin I with this year. His Math program is AOPS which is meant to be done independently. He loves it and it’s a great fit for him so we will continue to use it. I plan on having him do science at our co-op even though I’m comfortable teaching it at home. We happen to have some excellent high-school science teachers at the co-op and it’s a good way to lighten my teaching load a bit. The other classes for next year are more up in the air. Right now the plan is to do them all at home (rather than outsourced) but I’m researching options.

And the implied question…Isn’t it weird for a teen to want to be home?
No one has exactly asked this. But even from other homeschoolers there is an assumption that teens in general and even more so boys don’t want to be home with their parents. And if they do, there is something slightly odd about them.

I’m not foolish enough to think that John is choosing to homeschool in order to be with me. He’s choosing it for a lot of reasons. The main one is most likely that it’s what he already knows. It’s easy to continue doing the same thing. He also knows that the amount of free time he has is far greater as a homeschooler than in a traditional school. I joke that he’s the perfect homeschooler: he works hard but likes to do it in his own way and time. But in many ways that’s true. He gets up later than most kids his age, drinks coffee, reads the paper, and then gets to work.  I briefly check in on him several times a day and then we meet for longer times during the week for deeper discussions.

I do think that John doesn’t see being home with me as a bad thing. We get along well. We have similar personalities and like a lot of the same things. That isn’t to say that things are all sunshine and happiness. He’s a 13 year old boy and nowhere near perfect. He annoys me at times and I know I annoy him. However, overall we have fun together. And he (mostly) enjoys being with his brother and sister during the day. It’s not the main reason we are choosing to homeschool but it is a nice bonus.

Stay tuned. We’ll see what I’m saying four years from now when we’re coming to the end of his time at home. I can’t say for sure what high school will bring but if it’s anything like what we’ve done so far it will be a mix of the good and the bad. Regardless, I’m looking forward to this next part of our homeschool adventure.