Read Aloud Thursday

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If it’s the last Thursday of the month then it’s time for Read Aloud Thursday at Hope is the Word. Check it out. This week Amy has a lot of great early readers and picture books to share.

Part of our “read-aloud” culture is audiobooks. We almost always have a current audiobook going in the car. In the past few years we’ve enjoyed listening to several series in full. The current series we are totally absorbed by is Maryrose Wood’s  The Incorrigible Children of Ashton Place6609748We’ve  loved the first four in the series and finally got the fifth installation from the holds list at the library.

The plot is fairly typical of a middle grade mystery/adventure. The Victorian setting is unusual but the basic plot-line of mysterious orphans in some kind of vague danger will be familiar to readers of other juvenile stories. Penelope Lumley, a recent graduate of the Swanburne Academy for Poor Bright Females goes to work as a governess at Ashton Place. Her three young charges are unusual: they were raised by wolves. As the books progress the mystery of just how the Incorrigibles ended up in the forest intertwines with other mysteries: What is the howling coming from the attic, Why is Lord Ashton so obsessed with his Almanac, How did Penelope end up at the Swanburne Academy as a young girl and most importantly, Exactly what is in the hair tonic that the Swanburne headmistress insists that Miss Lumley use?

However, although the plot is somewhat unexceptional, there is much about this series that is truly exceptional. The characters are quirky but never snarky. There are frequent asides about topics as varied as synonyms and ferns and the dodo. Like the best Victorian literature, the reader is often addressed directly. There are running gags (like the fact that Miss Lumley or the children often imagine a modern invention like the phone or airplane but then are too busy to pursue actually inventing it.) The Incorrigibles themselves are model students if you are a teacher who wants students who are energetic, creative, and eager to learn. They may be distracted by squirrels but they are always ready for whatever lesson their beloved Miss Lumawoo has planned for them.

If you like slightly quirky books with a touch of mystery and a lot of sweetness underneath the off-beat humor, I highly recommend this series.

 

Newbery Challenge- 1940’s

1014090I’m participating again this year in Amy’s Newbery Challenge. This month was the 1940’s. I re-read one of my favorite books from childhood: Eleanor Estes’ The Hundred Dresses. It’s sort of a sad book and I remember liking it somewhat because it was sad instead of despite the sad. It tells the story of Wanda Petronski, a young Polish girl in a small town in Connecticut. Two other girls, Peggy and Maddie, daily make fun of Wanda. This is partially because of her claim that she has one hundred dresses at home even though she only wears the same old dress to school daily. But it is more because she is poor and foreign and because she is different from them.Wanda ends up moving away and the girls later discover that her story of a hundred dresses was true in a way. She leaves behind a hundred sketches of beautiful dresses. The girls try to find a way to contact her and apologize but it’s too late. In the end, they do hear from Wanda and there is some sense of forgiveness on her part but it’s not a completely satisfying ending.

I think the most compelling character in the book is Maddie. The main instigator of tormenting Wanda is clearly Peggy who is sort of a Mean Girl precursor. Maddie is Peggy’s best friend and is clearly less confident. She’s a little conflicted about mocking Wanda but never speaks up. This may be in part because she is also from a family who is poor. But I think most kids will recognize the conflict of knowing what the right thing to do is but not doing it because you don’t want to lose a friend or stand out or become the victim yourself. I think perhaps that is what attracted me to this book as a kid.

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I also read a new to me book: Fog Magic by Julia Sauer. This one was enjoyable; a girl who finds herself mysteriously drawn to thick fog in her Nova Scotia town learns that she can travel back in time through the fog. Her adventures are fairly tame, she mostly just goes back and visits a local family and becomes friends with a young girl in the past. But the story is sweet and appealing to anyone who has ever dreamed of going back in time.

Up next: the 1950’s. I plan to read The Secret of the Andes which beat Charlotte’s Web for the Newbery Medal in 1953 (Charlotte was an Honor Book). I’ve always been curious about the book that bested Charlotte.

A Week of Newbery Winners

I’ve spent the past week reading the 2016 Newbery Award Winners. I didn’t exactly plan to read them all at once, but they all arrived for me at the library at the same time so it seemed serendipitous.

Matt de La Pena’s Last Stop on Market Street is clearly the big topic of conversation this year, as the first true picture book to win the Newbery Medal. It also was named as a Caldecott Honor Book. The book tells the story of a young boy, CJ, and his Nana as they travel on the bus after church to the last stop on Market Street. CJ is a typical young kid who asks his Nana a lot of questions and expressed dissatisfaction with life as it is (Why don’t they have a car? Why do they always have to go where they are going on Sundays? Why can’t he have an MP3 player like the other boys on the bus?) His Nana lovingly and wisely answers his questions and helps to show him the beauty in the everyday world around him. The language is realistic and has the cadence and sound of real people talking but is also sprinkled with lovely and unexpected imagery.

My first impression after reading it was probably similar to a lot of people’s. It is a great book but I was a little confused about why it was deemed the Newbery Medal Winner, an honor I associate with much more complex books. And much longer books. However, the more I think about it the more I like the choice. So often I see parents want to move their kids along from picture books because they are “just for little kids”. As soon as kids start reading on their own we push them towards chapter books and out of the picture book section of the library. But there are so many wonderful picture books out there and I think by giving one of them the Newbery the committee has legitimized the idea that a good picture book is worth reading for all ages of kids, even those who have “graduated” on to much longer books. I love that my seventh grader still reads through the stack of picture books we bring home from the library each week. He likes good books, and I love that he doesn’t see himself as too old to enjoy a good picture book.

After serving on the Cybils selection commitee two years ago, I realize that the very concept of picking the ONE BEST BOOK is just ridiculous. There are so many wonderful books for kids and so many different reasons that a book might appeal to a committee at a particular time. I do think that this book was probably picked partially because the issue of diversity in children’s literature is a very hot topic right now. However, that doesn’t mean Last Stop on Market Street is not also without literary merit. It just happened to be a beautiful book that also fits in with the current thoughts about what is important and desired in kid lit. I’ve been reading along with Amy’s Newbery Through the Decades Challenge for the past year and one thing I’ve learned is how much books reflect their time and place.

I also read the three Newbery Honor Books this week and thought all three of them were very deserving of the honor. The War That Saved My Life by Kimberly Brubaker Bradley and Echo by Pam Munoz Ryan were both WWII era stories. Echo has some fairy-tale and fantasy elements that weave together three different tales about three children in difficult circumstances during WWII. Music is the theme that binds together all three stories. I enjoyed it but I really loved The War that Saved My Life, which tells the story of Ada, a young girl in London with a clubfoot who has been locked inside a room her entire life by her mother. When WWII begins Ada finds a way to escape with the other child evacuees to the country where she slowly begins to find a new life. I loved that the happy ending is not something that is easy. Ada struggles with being afraid of being happy and loved as it might all be taken away from her again. It’s a book that felt very real.

Victoria Jamieson’s Roller Girl also felt very real. Almost too real, like experiencing all the angst of middle school all over again. Perhaps this is the year of the graphic novel for me as I was totally charmed by this story of Astrid, a girl who is trying to figure out where she belongs. Her best friend is becoming interested in fashion and boys and ballet and Astrid feels left out and unsure of who she is until she finds her tribe at a roller derby camp. One thing I really liked is that Astrid is complex, not always likable, but always realistic and sympathetic. Similarly, we see that the friend isn’t all bad. It isn’t that girls who like ballet and fashion are bad and girls who like roller derby are good. It’s more how do you figure out how to become your own person while still hanging on to the friends you had when you were little and things were simpler. I would highly recommend this one for anyone in the middle school or almost middle school age.

Black Dove White Raven

20454599Continuing in the Africa theme for the month of January, I recently read Black Dove, White Raven by Elizabeth Wein. Like so many people I loved two of Wein’s previous novels (Code Name Verity and Rose Under Fire). Like her other novels, Black Dove. White Raven has teenage pilots as the protagonists and takes place around the time of WWII. However, the setting is pre-WWII Ethiopia instead of Europe and one of the two protagonists is a male.

Teo and Em are the children of female stunt pilots who are and also best friends. When Delia, Teo’s mother, dies during  a flying accident, Em’s mother fulfills a promise she made to Delia to take him to Ethiopia to raise him. Teo is the son of an Ethiopian father and Delia wants him to grow up away from the open racism she sees in the United States. Initially their new home on a cooperative coffee far is like an idyllic paradise for the family. However, an impending invasion of Ethiopia by Italy sets in motion events that change their lives.

I knew absolutely nothing about Ethiopian history before reading this book. And I realize that I still only know about a tiny sliver of that history. But know I now that there was a Italian-Ethiopian war preceding WWII in which most of the rest of the world failed to intervene because of the fear of escalating tensions in Europe at the time. I know that the Ethiopian church is believed my some to be the home of the actual Ark of the Covenant. I know that slavery was still legal in Ethiopia until 1942. I think one effect of reading is sometimes realizing all the things that I don’t know.

Black Dove, White Raven is a YA novel but the themes and language are as complex as many of the adult fiction books I’ve read. At the same time, although Wein doesn’t shy away from dealing with complex issues like war and slavery, the descriptions aren’t disturbing or graphic. I would be fine with my 12 year old reading it, although I don’t think he would be interested. (He doesn’t love realistic or historic fiction and will only read them as an assignment). It would have been a book I would have greatly enjoyed as a young teen and I would recommend it for middle school or high school students who like historical fiction or strong female characters.

 

A Long Walk to Water

7981456This year the kids and I are studying world cultures/geography. With the return to school in January we began a unit on Africa. With each area of the world we’ve studied we’ve read a lot of picture books. I’ve tried to have John read at least one longer work as well. He is a very good reader but needs to work on thinking more deeply about what he reads and on being able to discuss and write about books. For some of the books I’ve had him write essays or fill out a reader’s guide that I made for him. His view was that doing those “spoiled reading”. I understand his viewpoint, but it is still a skill we need to work on. So for Africa I decided to pick a book and then to meet weekly with him to orally talk about the book. Sort of a mini book club. I’m hoping that this helps him to think about the book more deeply than he normally would but that it isn’t as onerous of a task for him. And that it’s a stepping stone to being able to more easily write about what he reads.

I picked A Long Walk to Water primarily because the author, Linda Sue Park, is the author of many other books we have read and enjoyed. In it, she tells the story of two Sudanese children: Salva Dut, a Sudanese boy who is forced to flee into the bush when his village is attacked by rebels and Nya, a young girl who must spend all day every day walking to and from a water source in order to provide her family with drinking water. Salva is a real person and the account of his journey to Ethiopia, Kenya and ultimately the United States is based on his true story. Nya is a fictional character who is representative of the life of many Sudanese girls. Each chapter in the book is divided into two sections; one tells a part of Nya’s story and one tells a part of Salva’s story. In the end, the two stories come together in a satisfying way.

A Long Walk to Water is not a difficult read but the events are disturbing and so it is probably best for middle-school aged kids. Park does a good job of relaying Salva’s story in a truthful way without sugar-coating the horrible events but also in a way that is manageable for kids. It introduces the topic of the Lost Boys of Sudan and child soldiers and refugees and the effects of war on children. However, by including Nya’s story and the ultimate happy ending for both characters, kids will be left with hope instead of just horror. The book will also challenge kids to think about how they should react to what they read and how they might even help to bring about change in the world.

To read more: 
Salva Dut’s organization: Water for South Sudan
You Tube Video with Linda Sue Park and Salva Dut 

2015 Read-Alouds

We now have three kids who can read on their own but our family read-aloud time remains a treasured part of our day. Our typical nightly routine is to all sit on our (me and H’s) bed and read for about 30-60 minutes. I usually read two books: one is for the boys and one is for Ruth. In reality, almost always all three listen to both books. John will sometimes read his own book while I’m reading the “Ruth” book but often he ends up listening, or at least listening to the parts that he remembers that he liked when he was that age. We aren’t able to do this every night between my work schedule and swim meets and basketball games and Scouts and other activities. I only imagine that it will get harder as they get older but for now I am enjoying this quiet (relatively) time together at the end of the day.

I still also read a book at lunchtime, although that has gotten harder also. I often find myself reading other books at lunch. Sometimes poetry or picture books or something to go with what we are currently studying. And sometimes we are eating in a hurry or we do a popcorn lunch (which really means we watch a movie).

We also pretty much always have an audiobook that we are listening to in the car. We drive a fair amount, although not as much as some families I know, so we have plenty of time to get immersed in a story together.

So that’s the how we do it.

Here’s the what:

Bedtime Read-Alouds

Redwall by Brian Jacques
The Trumpeter of Krakow by Eric P. Kelly
The Book of Three by Lloyd Alexander
The Black Cauldron by Lloyd Alexander
The Castle of Llyr by Lloyd Alexander
Taran the Wanderer by Lloyd Alexander
The High King by Lloyd Alexander
The Island of Dr. Libris by Chris Grabenstein
Book Scavenger by Jennifer Chambliss Bergman
Ramona and her Father by Beverly Cleary


Ramona and her Mother
by Beverly Cleary
Ramona Quimby, Age 8 by Beverly Cleary
Ramona Forever by Beverly Cleary
Ramona’s World by Beverly Cleary
Winnie-the-Pooh by A. A. Milne
The House at Pooh Corner by A. A. Milne
Little House in the Big Woods by Laura Ingalls Wilder
Little House on the Prairie by Laura Ingalls Wilder
On the Banks of Plum Creek by Laura Ingalls Wilder
Matilda by Roald Dahl

Lunch-Time Read-Alouds:
Gone-Away Lake by Elizabeth Enright
Return to Gone-Away Lake by Elizabeth Enright

 

Audiobooks: 
The Sisters Grimm (all 9 books)
The Penderwicks in Spring by Jeanne Birdsell
Nurk by Ursula Vernon
The Sixty Eight Rooms series (all 4 books)
Ella Enchanted by Gail Carson Levine
Breadcrumbs by Anne Ursu

 

 

 

There weren’t any books listed above that we didn’t enjoy. This seemed to be the year of the series. The boys and I loved Lloyd Alexander’s Chronicles of Prydain series. Zoe loved both Ramona and Laura, two girls that she would love to know in real life. We spent many happy months with The Sisters Grimm in Fairyport Landing. I feel like I should also point out that our list reminds me that good stories don’t need to stay in categories of age or gender. When asked what their favorites of the year were both boys mentioned On the Banks of Plum Creek. Now admittedly, the 12 year old likes it solely for the leech scene, but he still likes it.

We are still finishing two of our books from the year: The Adventures of a South Pole Pig: A Novel of Snow and Courage by Chris Kurtz and A Christmas Carol by Charles Dickens. The latter is only for the boys as Ruth found it too scary. Next up we have waiting Mossflower by Brian Jacques (at the request of David) and The Doll People by Ann Martin. And for the car we have Chasing Vermeer by Blue Balliott.

Recently Read

I woke up with a small thrill of anticipation coursing through my veins. It took me a moment to remember why, but then it came to me: I was due to crack open a new Scientific Notebook. I’d jammed my first one chock-full of many Questions, a few Answers and various observations and sketches…..

But now  it was time to bid adieu to the old one and start the cheerful new red one Granddaddy had given me. I opened it and inhaled the smell of fresh leather and paper. Could anything top the promise and potential of a blank page? What could be more satisfying? Never mind that it would soon be crammed with awkward penmanship, that my handwriting inevitably sloped downhill to the right-hand corner, that I blotted my ink, that my drawings never come out the way I saw them in my head. Never mind all that. What counted was possibility. You could live on possibility, at least for a while.

From The Curious World of Calpurnia Tate by Jacqueline Kelly, p 47-48

Read Aloud Thursday: In Defense of the Series

Ruth and I just finished Beverly Cleary’s Ramona’s World, the last in the Ramona Quimby series. She was filled with excitement at finishing the series, not because she was glad it was over, but I think because she saw it as a celebration. We’ve had such a fun time sharing these books. I should add that even though I say Ruth and I read these together I should really say that all the kids listened to these. It was technically Ruth’s “special book” but the boys liked it just as much as she did.

The boys and I just finished Lloyd Alexander’s The Book of Three and are starting the next in The Chronicles of Prydain series, The Black Cauldron. Somehow, I missed these as a kid but I’ve heard fantastic things about these fantasy novels and had them on my to be read list for years. We loved the story of Taran, the Assistant Pig-Keeper and his companions and are looking forward to the rest of the series.

In certain bookish and literary circles, the term “series” is almost a bad word. I’ve heard people bemoaning the fact that their kids will only read series books. The truth is that kids love series. And for good reason. A good series is comfortable, it’s like visiting the same friends over and over again. A really good series creates a new world for the reader and each new book in the series expands and defines that world a little more.

There is something to be said for reading books that are not part of a series and something to be said for reading books that are not comfortable. Kids need challenge, just like adults. And it’s true that not all series are created equal. However, both my boys really got pulled into reading through series (and not always all that high quality). And as a family, many of the most memorable read-alouds we’ve done have been part of a series. There is something wonderful about inhabiting another world all together for an extended period of time.

Great Series to Read-Aloud:

The Melendy Quartet by Elizabeth Enright
The Penderwicks by Jeanne Birdsall
The Moffats by Eleanor Estes
Gregor the Overlander by Suzanne Collins
The Sisters Grimm by Michael Buckley (We’re currently enjoying #4 as an audiobook in the car.)
The Frog Princess by E. D. Baker
Humphrey the Hamster books by Betty Birney
The Dark is Rising by Susan Cooper
Narnia by C. S. Lewis
Lord of the Rings by J. R. R. Tolkien (Yes, they are long but one of my best memories with John is reading these together.)
Betsy-Tacy series by Maud Hart Lovelace

I’m a little late to the party, but it’s not to late for you to stop by Hope is the Word for Read-Aloud Thursday. Be sure to share what you are reading aloud with your family!

January/February Reading

Fiction Read in January and February 

Olive Kitteridge by Elizabeth Stout (audiobook)
I loved this book. I loved how vulnerable and sympathetic Elizabeth Stout makes grumpy, unlikeable Olive Kitteridge.

Sing for Me by  Karen Halvoresen Schreck
Eh. Read for my book club. 1920’s girl defies super-strict religious Dutch family by singing in a jazz club and falling in love with a black man. Was just a little too much like one the cheesy Christian romances I read as a teen for my taste.

The Assassination of Margaret Thatcher by Hilary Mantel
Weirdly creepy and slightly sinister (and I mean that in the best way possible) beautifully word-crafted stories.

Station Eleven by Emily St. John Mandel
One of the most fresh and new-feeling books I’ve read in a long time. Post-apocolyptic world after a flu pandemic seen through multiple characters, centering on Kirsten, a young actress with a traveling Shakespearean troupe.

Lila by Marilynne Robinson
The third book in Robinson’s triptych about the town of Gilead and pastor John Ames. This one tells the story of his much younger wife Lila who comes from a much different world than that of her husband. Lila is born into a horribly neglectful family and is stolen away (or rescued) one day by Doll, a wanderer. Doll and a group of migrant workers become Lila’s family as a child and teenager. Tragedy eventually leaves her on her own again until she arrives in Gilead. Like Robinson’s other books, deep essential religious questions are woven into the text. Lila decides to be baptized but isn’t entirely sure she wants to accept religion. Part of the issue for her is what religion says will happen to the people who were her family but certainly didn’t live any kind of “good” life. Lila is just as rich as Robinson’s previous works, Gilead and Home, which I count among my all-time favorite books.

All the Light We Cannot See by Anthony Doerr
What can I say about this one that hasn’t been said already by someone else. Having a deadline to read this for my book club, I had to buy it because I was something like 922 on the hold list at the library. I’ll just say the hype is not just hype. It is an amazing book. Read it. Even if you have to buy it yourself.

The Monogram Murders by Sophie Hannah
A new Hercule Poirot mystery, authorized by the Agatha Christie estate. It’s clever and fun to read a new story starring the great detective. Not super memorable but a nice read.

The Crocodile on the Sandbank by Elizabeth Peters (audiobook)
The Curse of the Pharoahs by Elizabeth Peters (audiobook)
I decided to listen to the Amelia Peabody mystery series as my next audiobook (I read a bunch of them years ago) when I heard that the narrator was excellent. She (Susan O’Malley) is and the mysteries themselves are just as much a hoot as the first time around.

The Long Way Home by Louise Penny
Next edition in the Armand Gamache series. I mostly like these but Penny’s wordy and overly serious style grates on my nerves at times.

Belzhar by Meg Wolitzer
I found this young-adult fantasy immensely readable and enjoyable. Emotionally-fragile teens able to access an alternative world where they can live their lives before the trauma that they have experienced. The book celebrates the power of words and writing and ultimately argues for the importance of facing your problems and moving forward in life. There is a twist in the end that took away some of my enjoyment, I found it somewhat unbelievable but it’s also been a long time since I’ve been a teenager so I might just be forgetting what it feels like.

The Meaning of Maggie by Megan Jean Sovern
Based on the author’s own life, this bittersweet middle age novel looks at a single year in the life of Maggie, an 11 year old future President of the United States, writer, and all-around lovable geek. Maggie’s father also happens to have Multiple Sclerosis that is fairly severe and the novel chronicles the effects of his worsening illness on Maggie and her family. Probably because it’s based on a true story, it reads very true and never feels like a dreaded “issue” book. I liked it as much for the quirkiness of Maggie as for the way it addresses chronic illness.

Non-Fiction Read in January and February

How Not to Be Wrong: The Power of Mathematical Thinking by Jordan Ellenberg

Being Mortal by Atul Gawande
I really meant to review this one fully when I read it but I think I never really felt worthy. I would probably read instructions for how to program the DVR written by Gawande. He would find a way to make them interesting. In this book he goes beyond interesting and looks at the more uncomfortable and personal topic of end-of-life living and decision making. As a pediatrician, this isn’t something I have to deal with a lot in my work but I still found much to challenge me professionally and hopefully make me better at caring for patients. Really, really excellent.

Overwhelmed: Work, Love, and Play When No One Has the Time by Brigid Schulte

Popular: Vintage Wisdom for a Modern Geek by Maya Van Wagenen
I hope to review this one more fully in the next few days. It’s fun and wonderful and I’m going to go and cry because it was written by a 15 year old. Actually, I think she’s 15 now so she was even younger when she wrote it. And did I mention it won the ALA award for best Young Adult Non-Fiction. And Dreamworks has optioned it to make a movie.

Newbery books read: 
I’m participating in Amy’s Newbery Through the Decades challenge
January:
The Trumpeter of Krakow by Eric P. Kelly- Definitely felt dated, but it was published in 1929. I read this one aloud to the boys and they mostly enjoyed this adventure story set in medieval Poland and involving alchemy and a mystical crystal. I think their favorite part was actually a character named Peter the Button Face who was supposed to be the chief bad guy. However, they found his name so ridiculous that they would laugh hysterically every time I said it. Like falling off the bed (literally) hysterically.

February:
Caddie Woodlawn by Carol Ryrie Brink- I have no memory of ever having read this as a girl although I vaguely remember trying it and not liking it. I’m not sure why as Caddie seems like a perfect mix of Laura Ingalls and Anne of Green Gables with maybe a sprinkle of Ramona thrown in. In full disclosure, I haven’t actually finished this one yet.

Read with the Kids:
Ruth and I are still working our way through the Ramona books. We’re up to the last one, Ramona’s World. Ruth is both excited and sad. Sad that they are almost over but excited because I said she could watch the movie when we had read them all. The boys and I are reading The Book of Three by Lloyd Alexander, another one I can’t believe I missed in childhood. In the car we’ve been listening to the Sisters Grimm books which all three kids are loving.

I Kill the Mockingbird

The kids in Paul Acampora’s I Kill the Mockingbird are the kids that the seventh grade me wished desperately to know. Lucy, Elena and Michael are best friends who also happen to be book nerds. One summer they come up with a plan of “literary terrorism” to get people interested in one of their summer reading books, To Kill the Mockingbird. What starts out as a local campaign spreads nationwide with the help of the Internet and they end up having to figure out how to kill their own creation.

The friends’ plan is about getting people to read great books on the surface but really it’s just as much about helping Lucy deal with her mother’s cancer and grieving the loss of a beloved teacher, Fat Bob, and figuring out how to have one last crazy summer before going off to high school. In the same way, I Kill the Mockingbird is about kids who love books but also about young teens who still have one foot in the camp of childhood but are aware that they are growing up. Like the classic that it pays homage to, it’s really a coming of age novel.

There is so much to like here. Any weakness comes from the need to suspend belief a bit to believe that there are still small towns and communities like the one portrayed here. The kids are all self-confident book lovers who don’t seem to worry at all about things like being cool or fitting in. The parents are all understanding and cool. The town is safe enough that the kids can wander wherever they want on their own, unencumbered by parental oversight, yet wordly enough that it supports an independent bookstore and is close enough by public transportation to many other small towns. There are no real negative repercussions from their campaign. Maybe that’s all nit-picky but it did read as a little idealistic to me. Still, I decided early on to just go with it and enjoy the book, idealism and all.

One thing Acampora does well is to include a religious life for the kids. They all attend a Catholic school, where Lucy’s father is principal. Catholicism is woven through the book along with discussions of faith and mortality and why bad things happen. It’s exceedingly rare to find an adult book that treats religious life as something ordinary. It’s seems that religion is usually either dealt with in a heavy-handed overtly Christian way or it’s dismissed outright. I think it’s even more rare to find a book for middle-grade kids that handles religion in this straight-forward way.

I would definitely recommend this for anyone (kid or adult) who loves books.