Read Aloud Thursday: From the New Shelf

We read a lot of picture books, although less than we used to and less than I wish we did. Today I have to share a small, somewhat random sample of some recent finds from our library’s new shelf that we have enjoyed. The first, Penguins in Peril, finds a penguin the unwilling captive of three dastardly cats. The cats have spent all their money on movies instead of food and craft. They come up with a plan to perpetrate the most daring robbery of all time and get all the fishes they want. But first they need a secret weapon: the penguin. The penguin outwits them in the end and the cat’s plan is thwarted. A first book by Helen Hancocks, this one definitely takes a dry sense of humor to appreciate. The somewhat flat text and graphically simple illustrations have a certain plain-Jane charm. My kids liked it when reading it the first time but I haven’t seen them reading it again on their own or seeking it out for second or third readings.

On the other end of the spectrum from the conniving cats in Penguins in Peril, is Sarah Weeks’ Glamourpuss, the title character in what can best be described as the Fancy Nancy of the feline world. Glamourpuss is, well, glamorous. The most glamorous pet ever. But then Bluebell, a tiny toy dog, comes to visit. Bluebell wears fancy clothes: hoopskirts and tiaras and fruit-covered turbans. Bluebell dances and does tricks. Glamourpuss starts to doubt herself. Then however, Bluebell tears up all her fancy clothes and Glamourpuss realizes that maybe there is room for two fabulous pets in the same house. David Small’s (one of my favorite illustrators) humorous illustrations are a perfect paring for this quirky and sweet story.

And for my last offering, we go back to simple, at least in concept. Mac Barnett’s Telephone takes the game of telephone and imagines how it would go as played by birds on a wire. The concept is simple but the execution is picture perfect. The message gets more and more garbled. Illustrator Jen Corace’s birds tell a story of their own as each bird changes the message according to his own job or hobby.

One reason we don’t read as many picture books as I might like is that with older kids, we spend more time reading chapter books. Chapter books are great fun as well to read, and I love our nightly “special book” time. But I think too often parents think that once their kids are old enough to move on to reading “big books” that the time for picture books is over. I recently discovered that my sixth grader still reads every picture book I bring home from the library on his own. It makes me happy that he doesn’t feel too old to enjoy what some kids might feel are books just for little kids.

Stop by Hope is the Word for Read Aloud Thursday and share what you family is reading together.

March Reading (The better-late-than-never edition)

Fiction Read in March: 

Big Little Lies by Liane Moriarty
Moriarty’s books are big, fun, juicy, frothy delicious reads. The women in them feel familiar to me even though they are Australian and inhabit a more upper-class world than my own. The overall subject of the book (domestic abuse and bullying) is serious but Moriarty manages to write about it in a way that is engaging to read and light in tone without making light of the horror of her topic. 

The Children Act by Ian McEwan
McEwan on the other hand could never be called light. Or frothy. I think I’m going to have to face the fact that I will never love a book of his as much as I loved Atonement. I keep reading him waiting for that completely blown-away by a book experience again and it hasn’t happened yet. Some of his books I’ve greatly disliked, this one I did enjoy reading except for one part that just didn’t ring true to me. The story is of a judge who is in the midst of a personal domestic crisis and who must render judgment on a case involving a minor’s right to refuse medical treatment. The boy is dying of cancer and needs a blood transfusion but is a Jehovah’s witness. The book is very much about the conflict between science and religion. 

The Dead in Their Vaulted Arches by Alan Bradley
Another wonderful chapter in the Flavia deLuce series. This one must be read after the others, it ties up lots of loose ends from previous books. 

The Girl on the Train by Paula Hawkins
I stayed up way too late on several nights reading this book. It’s that kind of book; what I’ve heard called a “thumping good read”. I read a fair amount of mysteries and thrillers so I guessed the solution to this one pretty early on but it still kept me turning the pages to see if I was right and to yell at the characters to figure it out before something bad happened. 

Strawberry Girl by Lois Lenski

Non-Fiction Read in March:

Brown Girl Dreaming by Jacqueline Woodson
Really beautiful memoir told in verse. It’s won a bunch of awards and all deservedly so. 

Red Madness: How a Medical Mystery Changed What We Eat by Gail Jarrow
I hope to review this one in full one day, but it’s a well-written detailed account of the investigation into the cause of pellagra, a disease that effected millions of people in the United States in the early 20th century and is estimated to have killed about 100,000 people. I loved reading Bernard Rouche’s classic books about true medical mysteries when I was a teen and would have been the kid who ate this book up when I was in middle school. A wonderful addition to the young adult nonfiction section of any library. 

Fierce Convictions: The Extraordinary Life of Hannah More–Poet, Reformer, Abolitionist by Karen Prior Swallow
Read for my book club, I had really high hopes for this one. Hannah More was an amazing woman and I thoroughly enjoyed the other book I’d read by Karen Prior Swallow.  This one fell a little short of expectations, however. It’s a bit dry and somehow makes More’s life seem a bit dull, which it was anything but dull. I would recommend it though for the chance to learn more about More, a truly remarkable woman. 

Read Aloud Thursday: In Defense of the Series

Ruth and I just finished Beverly Cleary’s Ramona’s World, the last in the Ramona Quimby series. She was filled with excitement at finishing the series, not because she was glad it was over, but I think because she saw it as a celebration. We’ve had such a fun time sharing these books. I should add that even though I say Ruth and I read these together I should really say that all the kids listened to these. It was technically Ruth’s “special book” but the boys liked it just as much as she did.

The boys and I just finished Lloyd Alexander’s The Book of Three and are starting the next in The Chronicles of Prydain series, The Black Cauldron. Somehow, I missed these as a kid but I’ve heard fantastic things about these fantasy novels and had them on my to be read list for years. We loved the story of Taran, the Assistant Pig-Keeper and his companions and are looking forward to the rest of the series.

In certain bookish and literary circles, the term “series” is almost a bad word. I’ve heard people bemoaning the fact that their kids will only read series books. The truth is that kids love series. And for good reason. A good series is comfortable, it’s like visiting the same friends over and over again. A really good series creates a new world for the reader and each new book in the series expands and defines that world a little more.

There is something to be said for reading books that are not part of a series and something to be said for reading books that are not comfortable. Kids need challenge, just like adults. And it’s true that not all series are created equal. However, both my boys really got pulled into reading through series (and not always all that high quality). And as a family, many of the most memorable read-alouds we’ve done have been part of a series. There is something wonderful about inhabiting another world all together for an extended period of time.

Great Series to Read-Aloud:

The Melendy Quartet by Elizabeth Enright
The Penderwicks by Jeanne Birdsall
The Moffats by Eleanor Estes
Gregor the Overlander by Suzanne Collins
The Sisters Grimm by Michael Buckley (We’re currently enjoying #4 as an audiobook in the car.)
The Frog Princess by E. D. Baker
Humphrey the Hamster books by Betty Birney
The Dark is Rising by Susan Cooper
Narnia by C. S. Lewis
Lord of the Rings by J. R. R. Tolkien (Yes, they are long but one of my best memories with John is reading these together.)
Betsy-Tacy series by Maud Hart Lovelace

I’m a little late to the party, but it’s not to late for you to stop by Hope is the Word for Read-Aloud Thursday. Be sure to share what you are reading aloud with your family!

Delicious Reads

Ruth and I just finished a unit on food for kindergarten. One of the favorite books we read was a new one by Emily Jenkins, A Fine Dessert. Jenkins follows four families over four hundred years making the same dessert: blackberry fool. Each family prepares the dessert following the same basic steps. The repetition in the text of the recipe and the similarities between the centuries (each child gets to lick the bowl) create continuity. However, the charm is in the differences. The first mother and daughter pair living in Lyme, England in 1710 use a whisk made out of twigs and cool their dessert in an ice pit in the hillside. The 2010 family (the only father and son pair in the book) live in San Diego and serve the dessert to a multicultural group of friends after preparing it with all the modern conveniences. Sophie Blackall’s delicately detailed illustrations draw the reader into each time period and further serve to tie the centuries together while also showing how clothing and housing and people have changed.

Pat Brisson’s Before We Eat: From Farm to Table is another new book about food. This
one take a less personal approach and looks instead at all the people who are involved in getting the food we eat on our table. There are farmers and ranchers, yes. But also, truck drivers and  grocery clerks and home cooks. The woodcut illustrations by Mary Azarian (illustrator of the Caldecott winning Snowflake Bentley) are beautiful and complement the simple text.

 

We also enjoyed looking through What the World Eats by Peter Menzel and Faith D’Aluisio. This one is chock full of information but it was a bit too much for five year old Ruth. However, the photos were fascinating. The main interest for us was a photospread for each country showing a typical family and all the food they eat in a month. It was really eye-opening for my kids to see how much less processed food most of the world eats and to see how little some people have to eat in a week.

Other food themed books we recommend: 

Minette’s Feast by Susanna Reich
Bread and Jam for Frances by Russell and Lillian Hoban
Cloudy with a Chance for Meatballs by Judi and Ronald Barrett
The Seven Silly Eaters by Mary Ann Hoberman
Dragons Love Tacos by Adam Rubin
Pinkalicious by Victoria Kann
Time to Eat by Steve Jenkins

 

 

 

January/February Reading

Fiction Read in January and February 

Olive Kitteridge by Elizabeth Stout (audiobook)
I loved this book. I loved how vulnerable and sympathetic Elizabeth Stout makes grumpy, unlikeable Olive Kitteridge.

Sing for Me by  Karen Halvoresen Schreck
Eh. Read for my book club. 1920’s girl defies super-strict religious Dutch family by singing in a jazz club and falling in love with a black man. Was just a little too much like one the cheesy Christian romances I read as a teen for my taste.

The Assassination of Margaret Thatcher by Hilary Mantel
Weirdly creepy and slightly sinister (and I mean that in the best way possible) beautifully word-crafted stories.

Station Eleven by Emily St. John Mandel
One of the most fresh and new-feeling books I’ve read in a long time. Post-apocolyptic world after a flu pandemic seen through multiple characters, centering on Kirsten, a young actress with a traveling Shakespearean troupe.

Lila by Marilynne Robinson
The third book in Robinson’s triptych about the town of Gilead and pastor John Ames. This one tells the story of his much younger wife Lila who comes from a much different world than that of her husband. Lila is born into a horribly neglectful family and is stolen away (or rescued) one day by Doll, a wanderer. Doll and a group of migrant workers become Lila’s family as a child and teenager. Tragedy eventually leaves her on her own again until she arrives in Gilead. Like Robinson’s other books, deep essential religious questions are woven into the text. Lila decides to be baptized but isn’t entirely sure she wants to accept religion. Part of the issue for her is what religion says will happen to the people who were her family but certainly didn’t live any kind of “good” life. Lila is just as rich as Robinson’s previous works, Gilead and Home, which I count among my all-time favorite books.

All the Light We Cannot See by Anthony Doerr
What can I say about this one that hasn’t been said already by someone else. Having a deadline to read this for my book club, I had to buy it because I was something like 922 on the hold list at the library. I’ll just say the hype is not just hype. It is an amazing book. Read it. Even if you have to buy it yourself.

The Monogram Murders by Sophie Hannah
A new Hercule Poirot mystery, authorized by the Agatha Christie estate. It’s clever and fun to read a new story starring the great detective. Not super memorable but a nice read.

The Crocodile on the Sandbank by Elizabeth Peters (audiobook)
The Curse of the Pharoahs by Elizabeth Peters (audiobook)
I decided to listen to the Amelia Peabody mystery series as my next audiobook (I read a bunch of them years ago) when I heard that the narrator was excellent. She (Susan O’Malley) is and the mysteries themselves are just as much a hoot as the first time around.

The Long Way Home by Louise Penny
Next edition in the Armand Gamache series. I mostly like these but Penny’s wordy and overly serious style grates on my nerves at times.

Belzhar by Meg Wolitzer
I found this young-adult fantasy immensely readable and enjoyable. Emotionally-fragile teens able to access an alternative world where they can live their lives before the trauma that they have experienced. The book celebrates the power of words and writing and ultimately argues for the importance of facing your problems and moving forward in life. There is a twist in the end that took away some of my enjoyment, I found it somewhat unbelievable but it’s also been a long time since I’ve been a teenager so I might just be forgetting what it feels like.

The Meaning of Maggie by Megan Jean Sovern
Based on the author’s own life, this bittersweet middle age novel looks at a single year in the life of Maggie, an 11 year old future President of the United States, writer, and all-around lovable geek. Maggie’s father also happens to have Multiple Sclerosis that is fairly severe and the novel chronicles the effects of his worsening illness on Maggie and her family. Probably because it’s based on a true story, it reads very true and never feels like a dreaded “issue” book. I liked it as much for the quirkiness of Maggie as for the way it addresses chronic illness.

Non-Fiction Read in January and February

How Not to Be Wrong: The Power of Mathematical Thinking by Jordan Ellenberg

Being Mortal by Atul Gawande
I really meant to review this one fully when I read it but I think I never really felt worthy. I would probably read instructions for how to program the DVR written by Gawande. He would find a way to make them interesting. In this book he goes beyond interesting and looks at the more uncomfortable and personal topic of end-of-life living and decision making. As a pediatrician, this isn’t something I have to deal with a lot in my work but I still found much to challenge me professionally and hopefully make me better at caring for patients. Really, really excellent.

Overwhelmed: Work, Love, and Play When No One Has the Time by Brigid Schulte

Popular: Vintage Wisdom for a Modern Geek by Maya Van Wagenen
I hope to review this one more fully in the next few days. It’s fun and wonderful and I’m going to go and cry because it was written by a 15 year old. Actually, I think she’s 15 now so she was even younger when she wrote it. And did I mention it won the ALA award for best Young Adult Non-Fiction. And Dreamworks has optioned it to make a movie.

Newbery books read: 
I’m participating in Amy’s Newbery Through the Decades challenge
January:
The Trumpeter of Krakow by Eric P. Kelly- Definitely felt dated, but it was published in 1929. I read this one aloud to the boys and they mostly enjoyed this adventure story set in medieval Poland and involving alchemy and a mystical crystal. I think their favorite part was actually a character named Peter the Button Face who was supposed to be the chief bad guy. However, they found his name so ridiculous that they would laugh hysterically every time I said it. Like falling off the bed (literally) hysterically.

February:
Caddie Woodlawn by Carol Ryrie Brink- I have no memory of ever having read this as a girl although I vaguely remember trying it and not liking it. I’m not sure why as Caddie seems like a perfect mix of Laura Ingalls and Anne of Green Gables with maybe a sprinkle of Ramona thrown in. In full disclosure, I haven’t actually finished this one yet.

Read with the Kids:
Ruth and I are still working our way through the Ramona books. We’re up to the last one, Ramona’s World. Ruth is both excited and sad. Sad that they are almost over but excited because I said she could watch the movie when we had read them all. The boys and I are reading The Book of Three by Lloyd Alexander, another one I can’t believe I missed in childhood. In the car we’ve been listening to the Sisters Grimm books which all three kids are loving.

Busy, busy, busy (again)

I went into Brigid Schulte’s Overhelmed: Work, Love, and Play When No One Has the Time with something of a pre-formed opinion. I had read the original article back in 2010 in the Washington Post that inspired her to look more deeply into the subject of leisure time (or lack of it) and even blogged about it here. At the time I came away slightly disappointed that Schulte didn’t more deeply examine our attitudes about work and busyness. I was interested in reading the book to see the idea fleshed out more and because she’s an excellent writer.

Schulte does explore society’s attitudes and norms regarding work, love and play in more depth in the book. She looks at the culture of  the “ideal worker”. A quote from Ben Hunnicutt (a leisure researcher) that stuck out to me this time was also one that I quoted in my previous blog post:

Work has become central in our lives, answering the religious questions of “Who are you” and “How do you find meaning and purpose in your life?”

As I said here and here, I think a lot of people like being busy. Or at least like the feeling that being busy makes them valuable. Schulte interviews a researcher named Ann Burnett who has been examining Christmas letters for years and has noticed that over the years

…people are competing about being busy. It’s about showing status. That if you’re busy, you’re important. You’re leading a full and worthy life. There’s a real “busier than thou” attitude, that if you’re not as busy as the Joneses, you’d better get cracking.

Schulte spends a lot time looking at ways that companies can cut down on work stress. Later in the book she spends a lot of time examining ways that couples can individually look at gender roles in their relationship and how society could find ways to be more supportive of working women and fathers who want to stay home. She had a lot that was interesting to say but at the end of her book I came away feeling slightly disappointed, as I did with the article.

Part of the reason was that I felt like she never really addressed the root cause of the overwhelm. What is it in us that causes us to make choices that make us busier and busier? Why do we need to sign up our kids for every activity under the sun? Why do we need to buy the bigger house which means we have to work more at a more demanding job? Why do we feel like being productive makes us somehow more worthy than having a lot of free time? Why do we equate self-worth to how much is on our to-do list? All of those are interesting questions and perhaps not answerable but no number of social programs or incentives by companies or flex-time or marriage counseling is really going to help us if we don’t somehow address them.

Another disappointment to me was the final section on play. In it, Schulte is a strong proponent for the idea of whimsical play. She spends time with a group of women who organize formal playdates (a word I cringe at using for my kids and can’t even begin to want to use for myself) where they do things like take trapeze classes or go rock climbing. Another play consultant is admired for her collection of goofy toys and her habit of blowing bubbles in the car. Schulte makes the case that for many years leisure time activities for women have actually been work: quilting, knitting, canning, baking. She is quite dismissive of quilting in particular, bringing it up as a poor example of play multiple times. I don’t quilt but I have always loved quilts. One of the things about them I love is that women didn’t have to make them artistic or creative but they chose to. It would have been quicker and just as warm to slap together some fabric and make and ugly blanket. But quilting became an art form over the years. It’s an example in my mind of women turning their work into something joyful and creative and, yes, playful.

I’m not advocating at all that all of leisure time has to be productive. And I’m not anti-bubble blowing. But there was something a bit too contrived about this kind of play in my mind. And again I think Schulte misses a chance to look at the deeper attitudes at play here (pun totally intended). Instead of seeking out new ways to play, it seems to me that we should first look to make the life we have playful. Or maybe to put it better, we should first examine our attitudes about the things that we have to do.

We got a dog last summer and she has to be walked daily. This is sometimes a dreaded chore (especially lately with single degree digit weather.) I find that when I look at it as a chore it feels like a chore. Last week, at the end of a long day with the kidsI took her out for a walk alone because I wanted to walk alone. It was a beautiful night with snow drifting down in soft white flakes. The dog loves the snow and she was so excited. There was no one else out even though it was relatively early. As I walked along in the dark, looking in lighted windows, and breathing in the cool crisp air, I was completely happy. It felt like play.  Same chore, but new attitude.

 

Daily Rituals: How Artists Work

Mason Currey’s Daily Rituals: How Artists Work offers delightful glances into the habits of a widely diverse group of artists, scientists, musicians, philosophers and writers. The book grew out of Currey’s blog, Daily Routines, that he started as a way to catalog these short descriptions of artist’s habits. The blog gives brief descriptions, often from an interview or article. The book goes a little deeper into the background of each subject to give the daily ritual some context. However, the strength of the book is that Currey uses the artist’s own words as much as possible. When that’s not available, he often uses a description written by a friend, family member or biographer who knew the subject well.

There’s something for everyone here. Did you know P. G. Wodehouse was a dedicated fan of The Edge of the Night soap opera, never missing an episode? Or Truman Capote preferred to only write lying down? Or Freud’s wife (that phrase right there gave me lots to ponder on….Freud’s wife) did everything for him freeing him up to work? Everything included putting toothpaste on his toothbrush, a task apparently to taxing for the great man.

The most interesting thing to me about the book was that there is really no one right way to be an artist. There are the “sit down and write (or paint, or compose) for x number of hours a day” people. Stephen King falls into this group. Highly disciplined, he views writing as his work and sits down daily to write 2000 words a day.  On the other end of the spectrum is Marilynne Robinson who says that she can’t write if she doesn’t feel inspired about what she is writing. Some are morning people, some are night owls. Some are solitary, some manage to schedule in their writing or art around a family life or day job. As different as the lives of these highly varied individuals are, there are also patterns of similarities that emerged as I read the book. For example, it was amazing to me how many spoke of taking some kind of scheduled walk every day, either as a way of starting the day or as a needed break in the middle of work.

I’ll end with three of my favorite quotes from the book:

Joseph Heller: ” I spent two or three nights on it for eight years. I gave up once and started watching television with my wife. Television drew me back to Catch-22. I couldn’t imagine what Americans did at night when they weren’t writing novels. ”

 

Friedrich Schiller:  “We have failed to recognize our great asset: time. A conscientious use of it could make us into something quite amazing.”

 

Bernard Malmud: ” There’s no one way- there’s too much drivel on the subject. You’re who you are, not Fitzgerald or Thomas Wolfe. You write by sitting down and writing. There’s no particular time or place- you suit yourself, your nature. How one works, assuming he’s disciplined, doesn’t matter. If he or she is not disciplined, no sympathetic magic will help. The trick is to make time- not steal it- and produce the fiction. If the stories come, you get them written, you’re on the right track. Eventually everyone learns his or her own best way. The real mystery to crack is you. “

Knock Knock: My Dad’s Dream for Me

It’s not hard to see why Daniel Beaty’s Knock Knock: My Dad’s Dream for Me has gotten great reviews (and is a Cybils picture book finalist). The young boy narrator begins by telling about the game his and his Dad play every morning. The boy clearly adores his Dad and his Dad loves him. But one day the Dad doesn’t come home. The boy sends him a letter and waits for a response. When the Dad finally writes back his answer is both heartbreaking I will not be coming home and beautiful No longer will I be there to knock on your door, so you must learn to knock for yourself.

Like all great illustrators, Bryan Collier watercolor and collage paintings tell the story along with the text. The expressions on the boy’s face are tender and sad and warm and compelling. I loved that the illustrations also went further than the text alone. As we hear the father’s words to the boy, we see images of the boy growing up and becoming a man with children of his own.

Diversity is a big buzz-word in kid lit this year. The fact that the boy in this book is African-American certainly makes this book a needed addition to a library. However, even more of a factor is that fact that the father in the book is in prison and that the story is based on the author’s own childhood and father. The fact that the father is in prison is not ever stated directly in the book, which might be confusing or upsetting for some kids if they think he has just left. However, I think leaving it vague was a wise decision. It mirrors the boy’s own confusion at what has happened and it leaves some space for discussion.

I’m often a bit torn about “issue books”. In general, I think adults like books that help kids deal with divorce or death or bullying much better than kids like reading those books. But I also believe that reading a book about a kid going through something similar to what he is  going through can truly help. Mostly I see a place for those kinds of book but I don’t particularly seek them out to read and enjoy with my own kids. Knock Knock is the rare book that transcends the “issue” genre. Yes, it would be a wonderful book for kids who are faced with the loss of a parent for any reason. Yes, it is great for children of color to see someone who looks like them in a book.  Yes, it is good for kids who don’t live in cities and who don’t have parents who are in prison to read about people who are different from them. But more than any of that, it’s a good book.

Armchair Cybils: Fiction Picture Books

Well, I’m almost a week late with this Armchair Cybils post. I did write a post last week, only to somehow lose it entirely. One of my New Year Resolutions is to be better about getting to bed on time and getting enough sleep so I elected to leave it and then never got back to it over the weekend.

I’ve been able to read all the Fiction Picture Books on the Cybils shortlist except one. (This is a Moose is not available yet at our library but is on order so I’m hoping to read it soon.) Of the books I was able to read, Mark Pett’s The Girl and the Bicycle is my favorite. It’s a sweet story of a girl who falls in love with a green bicycle in a store window. She tries to save the money to buy it, only to find that it’s harder to make money than she realizes. Finally, a kind neighbor hires her to do odd jobs and she gets the money she needs. Along the way she also finds a friend in the neighbor. The ending is no less satisfying for being somewhat predictable (at least to adults). The illustrations are simple pencil and watercolor on brown paper bag colored paper. The book definitely has an old-fashioned feel, although the feeling is more timeless than belonging to any particular era.

Over the past few years I’ve grown to appreciate wordless picture books more and more. I find that often the lack of written words allows for more interaction between me and the child I’m reading to. Instead of reading the words the author gives us, we talk about what we think the characters are thinking or what they are doing. It becomes a conversation instead of just a one-way read-aloud. I’m not at all disparaging books with words. I still prefer most of my books to have words. I’m just becoming more of a convert to the idea that well-done wordless books can be excellent also.

I hope to review the other nominated titles some day soon. But for now, stop by Hope is the Word and see what Amy has to say about the other books in this category. (Spoiler: She agrees with me. )

More wordless picture books reviewed at Supratentorial: 
Two from last year’s Cybils: Flora and the Flamingo  and Mr. Wuffles
A bunch including two favorites: A Ball for Daisy and 10 Minutes Till Bedtime
Once Upon a Banana
Gem

Snow!

Ruth and I are talking about snow this week in kindergarten. Serendipitously, this morning we woke up to the first real snowfall of the season. Perfect!  We weren’t sure what Roxy, the dog, would think of the snow since this is our first winter with her. She loved it, perhaps even more than her three human companions.

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Snow themed books we recommend: 

Snow! by Uri Shulevitz
The Snowy Day by Ezra Jack Keats
Snowflake Bentley by Jacqueline Briggs Martin
Katy and the Big Snow by Virginia Lee Burton
Over and Under the Snow by Kate Messner
Snowflakes Fall by Patricia Maclachlan