Fun Friday

Even after 7 years of homeschooling there are things I “always” want to get to but somehow never seem to get done on a regular basis. Last year, I was intrigued by the idea of Fun Fridays on Amy’s blog. I was intrigued but still didn’t really implement it in our homeschool. The main issue for me is that we have a schedule that really allows for only two full days of school with me home. Two other days I work part of the day. The other day  of the week we do a co-op. Friday happens to be one of our full days at home and so is usually one of our longer and fuller school days.

However, this year I would really like to have Friday be a little bit different. I’m not sure exactly what this will look like but my plan right now is to have Fridays be a mix of Science, Art,  Poetry Teatime, and other special activities.

IMG_2176Today, I had the boys do some work on their current unit study (architecture with H.) and do a little bit of math. Then we all got together to do art. We are traveling to Chicago in a few weeks (hence the architecture unit study) and plan on going to the Art Institute. There are many things we could have studied but I decided to focus on George Seurat’s A Sunday on La Grande Jatte because it was relatively easy to come up with a last minute art project. (Just being honest) I decided to do a project from MaryAnn Kohl’ s Discovering Great Artists. First, we used Q-tips and acrylic paint (tempera would work fine but we didn’t have any) to make dots on index cards. We first did only dots of one color on each index card. 

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Next, after letting the first set of dots dry, we used a Q-tip to put dots of a different color in between the original dots. We used only red, blue, yellow, black and white paint. The idea was to see if the card began to look more like two colors mixed together from far away. It’s important not to let the paint mix together on the paper if you do this. It would also probably work better with smaller dots. Our cards still mostly looked like dots from across the room. But when we went outside, we were able to walk far enough away where the dots disappeared and we saw orange instead of red and yellow dots. We had a brief discussion about the technique and also about how with computers and TV screens, basically everything uses the concept of pointillism. Next week, we’ll do a larger painting but this was enough for today.

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After art, I surprised the kids by asking if they wanted to ride bikes to lunch. They were all excited about the idea. Ruth has recently “graduated” to using John’s old bike that has gears and hand brakes and she is very excited about her new skills. Note that John is wearing a backpack. IMG_2187

The backpack was to carry his books so that he could read during lunch. We enjoyed a delicious pizza picnic lunch at our favorite local pizza place. Sadly, I was the only member of the family even mildly challenged by the mostly uphill ride home. 

Once home, we gathered for science. We’re going to focus on chemistry this year. We did a few experiments out of Adventures with Atoms and Molecules. This is more at the level of Ruth and David than John but he likes science so was happy to join in. The experiments are all very simple and the book includes some brief explanation/discussion that you can use for slightly older kids. I am also going to have John and David go through Ellen McHenry’s The Elements and we did a few pages in that as well.

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I had then planned to do a poetry teatime but the kids all really wanted to finish playing Elemento, a new board game I picked up for this year, that they had started yesterday. So, I decided to scrap poetry and let them play.

All in all, a good day. It felt pretty fun and we still got some good work done. And I managed to include at least one thing that each of them had put down that they wanted more of on the first day of school (art, books, bike rides, time outside, doing things with siblings).

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2 thoughts on “Fun Friday

  1. It sounds like a very full, very fun day!

    It’ll be neat for the kids to be able to see the painting in person after having studied it (and experimented with pointillism themselves.)

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