Astronomy Adventures

 We’ve spent the fall studying Astronomy as a family. Both boys read and enjoyed David Aguilar’s 11 Planets: A New View of the Solar System. Put out by National Geographic after the new definition of “planet” that demoted Pluto, this book offers a fantastic introduction to our solar system. Each planet including the three dwarf planets (Pluto, Ceres and Eris), has a two page spread. The information is simple enough that my third grader understood it, yet comprehensive enough that my sixth grader (and his mother) learned some new facts about our solar system.

The back pages of 11 Planets include an activity to make a scale model of the solar system. This was similar to an activity we did three years ago when John was in 3rd grade. I remembered it being fun and a good visual representation of the vastness of the solar system so we decided to do it again.

It’s a fairly simple activity. You find items to represent the sun and the 8 planets (plus the three dwarf planets) IMG_1283. I didn’t get a photo this year of the things used, you can look back at my old post if you are interested. 11 Planets  has ideas for items to use; the first time we used the suggested items from this website. This time we used a small pumpkin as the sun. Earth was a mustard seed. The biggest planet, Jupiter, was a cherry tomato. Pluto was supposed to be a single speck of baking soda but I’d like to ask David Aguilar exactly how he managed to do that. I just drew a miniscule dot on an index card to represent the dwarf planets.

Once you have the items, head out somewhere where you can lay them down.  11 Planets and the website linked above both have directions for how far to walk each time. You will need a fair amount of distance. We walked about half a mile or more and we opted not to walk all the way to represent Pluto as the kindergartener in our group was getting grumpy. We are lucky to live very close to a bike trail which is ideal for this, providing a long straight path.

The wow factor is in how far you have to walk between the planets once you get to the gas giants. It’s also pretty interesting how close the four rocky planets are. The other wow item in the 11 Planets version was to include a comet, represented by 70 feet of ribbon. This was the almost the same distance as between Mars and Earth. That was mind-boggling. The other mind-blowing addition was to include an orange to represent the next closest star to our solar system, Proxima Centauri. The idea was to get to the end and then tell them we would now walk to the next closest star, but to have it be the correct-to-scale-distance they had to walk 2400 miles. However, we did this activity pre-lunch and to appease the grumpy kindergartener we had to eat Proxima Centauri midway through the solar system.

IMG_1286We joked that only in a homeschool could you combine snacktime, science, PE, nature study and pet care. And include three grades together. I’m not sure how much Ruth got out of this except to think the Sun is a pumpkin. But since I wrote last time that David thought that planets are peanuts I doubt it will cause her any lasting harm or confusion. It was a perfect activity for David’s age and a great review for John.

John has enjoyed several other Astronomy related books in the past couple of weeks. Primarily two by Ellen Jackson from the Scientists in the Field series: Looking for Life in the Universe: The Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence and The Mysterious Universe: Supernovae, Dark Energy and Black Holes. I also purchased Solar System: A Visual Exploration of All the Planets, Moons and Other Heavenly Bodies that Orbit our Sun before this school year and it’s been a great resource for research. For experiments we’ve been using some Science in a Nutshell kits by Delta Education. Both boys are Scouts and are working on earning various Astronomy badges and pins and things.

DSCN2786However, you can’t really study astronomy only during the day. We were quite lucky recently to be able to see a lunar eclipse. I actually had to go to work so had to do my viewing from the car but H. woke up the kids early and they went our for an early morning walk to catch the eclipse. On Friday we woke John up early so he could see a particularly clear sky where several constellations were visible. We plan on going to a planetarium and observatory and perhaps doing some more night viewing together. A generous friend lent us a very good telescope to use to enhance our studies. But the lunar eclipse reminded me that the best learning often happens when we seize an opportunity to do something together. This didn’t require anything other than waking the kids up and walking down the block to where there was opening in the trees. Learning can be fairly simple and at home and still be extraordinary.

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